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Coffee! Give me coffee!




This is Baytown Bert in Baytown, Texas September 5th, 2014 and this is Podcast 11

My all time favorite John Wayne line is from True Grit when he is awakened by his servant after a hard night of drinking and utters the lone word, “Coffee”.   The reason is quite simple; it is exactly what comes to mind when my eyes open each morning and the responses that follow, shows many of us share the same experience.

Facebook.  There are a lot of negatives in our minds when it comes to social networking and I agree, but I enjoy it and practice a sort of freedom on the site and am willing to accept the dangers there also.  I frequently use the network to express provocative opinion and then gather the responses.  I’m sure at times people shake their heads at what I post, but at the same time, my comments stimulate them to define what they truly believe.

Years ago, I adopted the philosophy that anyone who stimulates me to defend what I believe is actually doing me a service – and if I am flexible enough to listen and weigh out a new approach, I may learn something.  Anyway, enough about all of that, let’s talk about the fantastically energizing morning elixir, coffee.  Great god almighty, I do love my morning coffee!

Librarian extraordinaire Angie Middleton drinks “Folger's Classic Roast, with the addition of some French Vanilla AM Coffee, a tiny sprinkle of Splenda with a couple of tsps of Cremora.”

GCCISD Educator Jennifer Stephens loves “Cinnabon cinnamon roll or blueberry mountain coffee” while fellow educator Caren Miller punches sissy coffee drinkers in the nose with “Community Club dark roast...strong and black”.  Another GCCISD teacher has a much more colorful approach.  Traci Cormier likes “Venti nonfat latte with 2 sweet n lows @ 140. - or an IV hook up, whichever is quicker.   In Hawaii I drank a ton of Kona dark roast. It was the bomb.com.”

Liberty County columnist and chow-chow expert Charlie Farrar offers a Zen approach by choosing “Tasters Choice with boiling water”.  Local resident Jake Daniel is old school with his choice of “Community coffee in the percolator on the stove”, as is polymer expert Darrell Bailey who goes hardcore with “Jet fuel, straight up black!”

Armed Forces veteran’s advocate Ren Fitts doesn’t bandy words. “Jail house coffee like I drank with my uncle who was a sheriff after the pot was on all day and if it was cold he would reheat it” and neither does local hawk Barbara Pugh with her humorous contribution, “Put whipped crème vodka in it. Makes a great day off cup of coffee and the brand won't matter.”

REL reunion organizer Bev Engelhardt. “I drink hazelnut flavored coffee with hazelnut flavored creamer! Yuuummm!”  Local resident Susan McGuyer, like Bev, goes for “Starbucks w/cinnamon vanilla cream, Coffee-mate & one Stevia sweetener.”  Big time Plant operator Larry Houston joins the flavor enhancer crowd with, “My fav right now is the Green Mountain Sumatran Reserve (K-cup), with a sprinkle of Truvia and a teaspoon of honey.... and some Coffee-mate French Vanilla creamer. Otherwise it's too dang bold. I like my beer dark... my coffee, not so much.”

David Clark didn’t say what he prefers, but lowers the hammer on the sweet coffee crowd with, “Sounds like some of you have breakfast drinks more than coffee!”  After that remark, I need to confess that I drink French Market with chicory and add nothing but water.  My coffee is so black and strong, a spoon could stand on end in the middle of the cup.

My son in law Michael Sievers also brings a humorous side to coffee drinking, “I chug my coffee (day old and cold) like I am shot-gunning a beer.” And like veteran Ren Fitts, retired Master Chief JW Kern is all military with “Navy Mid-watch Coffee (Generic 20# tins) at 0745, last cup before making another two 50 cup pots. Thick & black (resembles Texas crude oil straight from the ground)”.

My two favorite responses were from first, a Georgia friend since the late 60’s Debi and second, my best man, James and they are both artists in writing about their love of coffee drinking.

Deb Hearn "Cold Brew Coffee with the Toddy coffee maker. It is better if you have acid reflux and tastes great. I usually use Newman’s Own Dark Roast Organic. You put the water & coffee in the container, set overnight, pull plug in bottom & it filters into a glass jar. You will have thick coffee.  When you want a cup you put about 1/4 cup into your coffee cup, add hot water & enjoy. You only have to make it about once a week."

James Shipp "I like mine made with mountain spring water boiled over a bed of aspen coals in an old coffee can with a fistful of coarse ground coffee. I ain't picky about the brand as long as it’s strong enough to float a horseshoe. Throw in some cold water to knock the grounds to the bottom of the can and pour it up fresh! Do this while the elk are bugling in the meadow below and you will experience heaven on earth!"

No matter what expert comes up with saying coffee is bad for you, ten more will post a paper the next day extolling it anti-oxidant contribution to the body.  I like it regardless of what the detractors may say and to them, I agree with what Clark Gable told Vivian Lee in Gone with the wind, “Frankly my dear…”

Comments

Anonymous said…
Just read it and left a 'cool' for ya! AM
Patrick Newman said…
Ahhh, so *that's* what your coffee topic on Facebook was for....research.

I will admit that I was introduced to Tanzanian Peaberry coffee by a complete stranger, who doesn't even know how grateful I am for this.

Author Spider Robinson in his book The Callahan Chronicles, wrote of Tanzanian Peaberry coffee as the brew of choice of one of the main characters. Naturally I had to try it. I'm glad I did....it's good stuff!

Between that and Jamaican Blue Moutain, I'm set for my "gourmet" coffee. During the week, I drink Yuban. It's much richer (and less expensive) than Folger's Dark Roast.
Patrick Newman said…
Ahhh, so *that's* what your coffee topic on Facebook was for....research.

I will admit that I was introduced to Tanzanian Peaberry coffee by a complete stranger, who doesn't even know how grateful I am for this.

Author Spider Robinson in his book The Callahan Chronicles, wrote of Tanzanian Peaberry coffee as the brew of choice of one of the main characters. Naturally I had to try it. I'm glad I did....it's good stuff!

Between that and Jamaican Blue Moutain, I'm set for my "gourmet" coffee. During the week, I drink Yuban. It's much richer (and less expensive) than Folger's Dark Roast.
Anonymous said…
I upgraded to a multiple serve Keurig and have found Community Coffee k-cups sprinkled with Community Coffee's creamer does the body good! RB
Anonymous said…
Ren Fitts: seen that Bert in paper, again GREAT work....
Anonymous said…
My old friend James Shipp is the winner!!!!
Thanks for sharing with us BB!!!!!
Buddy C.
Anonymous said…
Bert, I enjoy these blogs. I wish I had found them sooner. SR
Anonymous said…
OMG! I'm dying! I needed that. Traci C.
Anonymous said…
Man on the street reporting, good job! SW
Anonymous said…
Another fine article this morning. I always look forward to Fridays so that I can read them. DDC
Anonymous said…
Jennifer Barnett Stephens: I'm not much for reading blogs. But these are great!
Steve Liles said…
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the bible of the mental health profession, even lists cigarette smoking and coffee drinking as mental illnesses.

This is from a Guns and Ammo discussion about CHL and mental illness, the box that ask one question. Have you ever been in a mental institution. That's great news to hear and makes the coffee nation exempt. We all dodged that bullet. You know though I have never drank coffee myself. It's Coca Cola for me and must work. To all his Cuckoo's Nest.

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